Housing Archive:

Updated for January: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, what the typical ranges are, and lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care. In other words, it’s a very sleek example of how to graph snapshot data while still providing valuable context.

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Updated for November: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, and what the typical ranges are. It also lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care, and historical values.

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A nicely annotated analysis of changing house prices in the DC region. The main graphic shows how much you would need to earn to buy a “typical single family home”. There is also an interactive version which lets you compare information for different time periods and look at condo vs house sales. (related article)

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Barry Ritholtz has another great post about the housing market over at The Big Picture.  In addition to his analytical insights, he pointed out two great tools for looking at housing markets across the country.

The first is a Rent vs Buy interactive from Trulia:

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(related Trulia article and methodology)

Second is the Wall Street Journal’s chart of price-to-income ratios (compared to the 1985-00 average).

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(related WSJ article)

This interactive tool from the Washington post lets you see how much your credit score affects the interest you will pay on mortgage and auto loans.

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A pretty comprehensive explanation of the financial crisis. (via The Big Picture)

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Percent of mortgage applications that were denied in 2010. “In all, the nation’s 10 largest mortgage lenders denied 26.8% of loan applications in 2010, an increase from 23.5% in 2009.”

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My favorite economic status tool. Point and/or click on anything and everything to learn something new about the economy, and why you should care.

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The backlog of mortgage delinquencies continues to stagnate after court rulings slowed the process in most states. The housing market won’t really be operating as a “market” for quite some time.

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Even with the low interest rates, housing prices continue to tank (with only Washington, DC showing an increase).

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Based on these indicators, things are returning to normal.

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Trulia maps out some cool housing price stats: The number of days a listing is on the market before they lower the price, how much they lower it, and the probability it will be lowered again – all by zip code. (via)

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This is in addition to Trulia’s existing housing dashboard and heat maps, which are nifty as well:

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Updated chart of the classic Case-Shiller housing price index. On the one hand it looks like the decline may be bottoming out – but on the other, there is still massive intervention supporting the market and we could very likely overshoot fair value.

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Patchwork Nation tracks a number of traditional economic and social indicators over time – but they also include some interesting alternative ones:

Cracker Barrel restaurants and Whole Foods Stores:
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Gun shops and Casinos:
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Bankruptcies 2007 vs 2010:
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Change in family income 1980-2010:
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2010 census data illustrates the gradual gentrification of DC – the city that was 70 percent black in the 1970s is now estimated at less than 50 percent. Heck, from 1990-2010 rising housing costs chased ME across town from Georgetown to Mount Pleasant to Capitol Hill. The related article has some interesting details.

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There are also two interactive versions: