Finance Archive:

A new graphic from HistoryShots, based on Reinhart & Rogoff’s well researched book: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly. The top half of the chart maps financial crises in terms of GDP affected, while the bottom indicates number of sovereign defaults.

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I just ordered a copy. If you’re into this long-term economic history stuff, check out US Booms and Busts (1775-1943).

A series of excellent annotated charts on the main indicators of the European crisis.

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An interesting long term perspective.

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These 11 charts appeared on BBC, so they are very Euro-centric, but there are still some gems. My favorite:

For a long time the perception was that the creation of the euro meant sovereign risk was effectively the same across all countries. That of course proved to be wrong. The Lehman’s crisis and financial meltdown that followed affected the deficits and debt levels of different countries in different ways. Interestingly it is much the same countries now with very high yields as it was pre-euro, suggesting little has changed fundamentally in a decade.

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This jumps around a little too much for my taste – but it is a good example of using simple facts to put things in perspective.

Here’s a slightly more in depth, much more tongue-in-cheek version (from two years ago):

Finally, an even more tongue in cheek SNL skit about which god is in charge of Greek finance:

Updated for November: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, and what the typical ranges are. It also lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care, and historical values.

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Some very well organized statistics on the Eurozone debt crisis, aggregated from the IMF, OECD, Eurostat, and the World Bank. It includes data on EFSF commitments, debt, SGP criteria, employment, trade, pensions, and mortgages. There are multiple dashboards, each with multiple tabs – so take the time to explore a bit. I particularly like the little sparklines – which I think do a great job of quickly illustrating trends, and don’t get used often enough.

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A well annotated graphic from the NYT. Over at Visual Journalism, they point out the design differences between the print and online versions of this graphic.

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online version:
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10 beautiful charts from the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Fiscal Analysis Initiative, examining the United States Debt and the challenges facing Congress’ Super Committee.

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A series of 30+ charts on unemployment, wages, corporate profits, income inequality, debt, taxes, and bailouts from the Business Insider. It’s actually quite an accurate compendium, and the narrative annotation spices up what are otherwise pretty dry charts from the St. Louis Fed (note: if you’ve never used the FRED data/graphing system, you should really go play with it – they even have an APP now). I particularly like the sequence where they illustrate that banks are borrowing money from the FED at basically zero interest rates, and using it to buy treasuries. Hilarious.

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What is shocking to me is that there are 12 states with no shortfall.

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Note: Some Financial Times features require a subscription.

Cheap money and slow growth in the advanced countries has led to large capital flows to emerging market countries, as this interactive tool from the WSJ shows. If you mouse over each country you can view countries’ policy responses. I really like these map/graph combo designs – the two go very well together.

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From MSNBC and the American University: Identify your bank (or credit union) by name or location, then see how many non-performing loans and other troubled assets it has:

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of related interest is this 2010 chart that Barry Ritholtz recently noted:

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Interactive comparison of bank market capitalization, income, and employees. The data are interesting, but the color selection could use more contrast, and the representation of negative values for net income is just bizarre.

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Note: some FT features require a subscription.

Bloomberg compiled some stunning new data on Fed loans to Wall Street banks during the crisis based across multiple programs (Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility, Commercial Paper Funding Facility, discount window, PDCF, TAF, Term Securities Lending Facility and single-tranche open market operations). (related article; via The Big Picture)

I wish I could borrow from the Fed at <2% using junk bonds as collateral. 

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You get the below charts by selecting multiple banks to compare them:

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