Housing Archive:

Trulia maps out some cool housing price stats: The number of days a listing is on the market before they lower the price, how much they lower it, and the probability it will be lowered again – all by zip code. (via)

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This is in addition to Trulia’s existing housing dashboard and heat maps, which are nifty as well:

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Updated chart of the classic Case-Shiller housing price index. On the one hand it looks like the decline may be bottoming out – but on the other, there is still massive intervention supporting the market and we could very likely overshoot fair value.

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Patchwork Nation tracks a number of traditional economic and social indicators over time – but they also include some interesting alternative ones:

Cracker Barrel restaurants and Whole Foods Stores:
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Gun shops and Casinos:
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Bankruptcies 2007 vs 2010:
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Change in family income 1980-2010:
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2010 census data illustrates the gradual gentrification of DC – the city that was 70 percent black in the 1970s is now estimated at less than 50 percent. Heck, from 1990-2010 rising housing costs chased ME across town from Georgetown to Mount Pleasant to Capitol Hill. The related article has some interesting details.

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There are also two interactive versions:

Housing prices trends don’t look the same if you adjust for inflation.

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On a side note, the designer of the above, Catherine Mulbrandon over at Visualizing Economics, has a kickstarter campaign to fund production of a new publication on US Income. She does great work and I recommend you donate, if so inclined.

One of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, and what the typical ranges are. It also lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care, and historical values.

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View the inflation adjusted Case-Shiller home price index as if you were riding the chart on a roller coaster. An update of the classic version from Speculative Bubble (that only went through 2007).

I don’t know why it took so long for someone to graph the Case-Shiller data this way, but I like it:

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Real estate listing service Trulia has created this interactive map of median rental costs vs purchase prices on a two bedroom home. In case you are thinking of moving, they also supply bar charts of unemployment, foreclosure, and job growth for the same cities.

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The data is updated each quarter and supplemented with a series of simpler infographics:

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If you want to know the state of the US economy at any time, check out the below visualizations from Russell Investments and the AP. They are both updated monthly with the latest data, allow all kinds of drilling down, and both take the time to document sources and explain why you should give a shit about these particular numbers (for example, click on any of the “historical details” links on Russell’s dashboard).

economic indicators dashboardAP economic stress index

The NYT’s has created a huge variety of interactive maps based on the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Click on “view more maps” to see different breakdowns (income, race, housing, education). Roll-overs popup details at the county or census area level. Related article.

Here’s the percentage of foreign born population in Washington DC:

Heat map of washington DC showing percent of foreign born population

Change in income level since 2000:

Map of United States showing income level change since 2000

This one shows how racially divided DC still is (green vs blue)”:

Interactive map showing washington DC race geographically

They also used the data for some more detailed analysis, such as “How NYC’s Racial Makeup has changed since 2000” (clockwise from upper left: white, hipanic, asian, black). Related article.

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This map timeline shows how the average number of days owners spend in delinquency before being foreclosed on has more than doubled since 2007.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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