Politics Archive:

Click on each state in the map with your predictions, and the running total at the bottom will tell you who wins! You can also cycle through the results of elections 1789-2008, which is entertaining if you read the little election facts at the bottom of each map.

image

Personally, it kind of reminded me of playing Risk on the computer back in college.

I love that the content was pulled together and includes the names of the victims – but you can barely read the names, and often can’t tell how the countries and names line up.

The NYT presents a list of options for you to decide how to trim defense spending. As usual, it’s not quite as easy as you might think – but I still got it up over $800 billion.  I like this interactive way of educating people about budget issues.

image

I usually don’t like viewing stacked bars over time – it’s too hard to see what’s changing. This one still isn’t perfect, but the deficiencies are moderated somewhat by clear labels and only having the three columns. Content wise, it’s pretty fascinating too.

image

To understand this chart you have to be quite the congressional procedure wonk. I think they should at least have to go back to having to talk the whole time. While standing on one foot. In uncomfortable shoes. With their mom watching.

image

We’ve looked at female world leaders before. Here are some stats on representation (well, what is supposed to be representation).

 image

A nice progression of intermediate steps in preparing a newspaper map of Santorum’s campaign, using R.

image image image

Share of income that comes from government programs, broken down by type of benefit. (related article)

image

From the 2012 Military Balance report. (via)

image

There’s also a 2012 Chart of Conflict – but I couldn’t find a decent sized image on their site. I think they want you to buy it.

There’s are a lot of nonsense charts and projections in Paul Ryan’s new House Republican budget, but rather than get into political arguments, I’ll just post the ones I thought were actually insightful:

image

image

image

Some interesting facts and timelines about the Transportation Services Administration. I usually don’t post these types of info-posters anymore, but the timeline in particular caught my eye

image image

How long do country leaders stay in charge, on average?

image

I’m not a fan of the Heritage Foundation, and the one time I dug into the data of their Economic Freedom Index I found that they occasionally compare apples and oranges to get around data scarcity – BUT: they do put a large research effort into the report each year. The below interactive map is well executed – but you should drill down to country level data to get a feel for what is really being measured (click on a country, then the “learn more about this country” link that pops up in the lower left. Why this requires two steps I have no idea).

image

A wonderful post over at The Big Picture that takes both liberals and conservatives to the wood shed over their abuse of economic indicators and charts that show correlation but not causation.

image image

 image image

Note: The comments over there are worth a read as well.

Nice chart from the NYT showing average S&P 500 company tax rates 2005-10: total taxes (fed,state,local,foreign) over pre-tax earnings, by sector.  A weighted average dot would have been nice for each sector. (related article)

image