Global Economy Archive:

From the 2012 Military Balance report. (via)

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There’s also a 2012 Chart of Conflict – but I couldn’t find a decent sized image on their site. I think they want you to buy it.

I’ve posted charts based on Maddison’s GDP dataset before, but here’s a new one that tacks on IMF projections. Obviously, the timeline scale isn’t linear and thus distorts things a bit, but the broad point is the same.image

Artist Gary Simpson created a series of frescos in 2006 based on global indicators from the CIA’s factbook. A bit stylized, to say the least, but I applaud the effort. Below are my favorites:

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I’m not a fan of the Heritage Foundation, and the one time I dug into the data of their Economic Freedom Index I found that they occasionally compare apples and oranges to get around data scarcity – BUT: they do put a large research effort into the report each year. The below interactive map is well executed – but you should drill down to country level data to get a feel for what is really being measured (click on a country, then the “learn more about this country” link that pops up in the lower left. Why this requires two steps I have no idea).

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A sankey diagram illustrating where one particular Shanghai office worker spends his money.

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Another cool piece from HistoryShots – this one looking at the growth, consolidation, and death of automobile companies.

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There are a number of interesting and well designed charts in the 2011 Global Wealth Report from Credit Suisse. The private sector actually does a lot of good analysis and visualization work that just doesn’t get publicized much.

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This one took me a minute to figure out – it’s showing distribution of wealth by decile:

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There are a series of charts on wealth and age:

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Thanks to Sean R for sending in the link!

Wow. I didn’t realize China’s investment in the USA was so small.

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A billion here, a billion there – soon you’re talking about real money.

News reports often focus on debt to gdp ratios, but it’s powerful to actually show the magnitudes of each, and compare the amounts already committed to what remains to be financed, as is done here by Spiegel:

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A rawer way of looking at the debt of all of the PIIGS, in piles of euros:

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This version shows who loaned Greece the money:

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The World Economic Forum always has some interesting visualizations and info-videos.

Global Risk Map:

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Interactive Risk Explorer (be sure to play with the menu tabs on the right):

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Almost makes it look like they’ve done a lot:

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Another problem brewing. The world is running out of places to kick the credit can. As usual, there is much insight to be gained from the discussion and comments over at Barry Ritholtz’s The Big Picture.

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A new graphic from HistoryShots, based on Reinhart & Rogoff’s well researched book: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly. The top half of the chart maps financial crises in terms of GDP affected, while the bottom indicates number of sovereign defaults.

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I just ordered a copy. If you’re into this long-term economic history stuff, check out US Booms and Busts (1775-1943).

Some pretty interesting facts about gold.

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A series of excellent annotated charts on the main indicators of the European crisis.

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