Employment Archive:

One of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, what the typical ranges are, and lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care. Looks like a lot of indicators are finally in the “typical” range.

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Interactive graph of where the money comes from to pay medical bills (private insurance, medicare, out of pocket, etc).  It’s interesting that private insurance still only covers a small amount of total expenses (~39%).

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Some slick programming in this annotated exploration of 50 years of poverty statistics. Tough I’m not a fan of the pie charts, per se, the rollover drill down is a nice idea. Be sure to click on the small “change year” to bring up a timeline slider that updates in real time. Like I said – slick!

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Retirement Ages

In: Employment

11 Jul 2012

Don’t wait. Enjoy life now.  (related article)

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We also wanted to see how well or poorly one person working full-time (40 hours per week, 52 weeks per year) at the minimum wage could support a family of four.

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A nice interactive from USA Today. Select your job sector and see where in the country the most growth has been, and is projected to happen in the next year. They update this monthly.

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Basically, what’s going on is, any dot above the diagonal line represents an industry where job growth is faster now than it was pre-recession. Any dot below the line indicates slower job growth.

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One of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, what the typical ranges are, and lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care about these numbers.

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The FT takes an insightful look at British household disposable income by generation – examining the long held belief that each generation is better off than the previous one. That notion has been true – until the most recent one. I think putting age on the x-axis was brilliant. Anyone want to generate this for the USA?

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note: some FT features require a subscription to view.

A wonderful post over at The Big Picture that takes both liberals and conservatives to the wood shed over their abuse of economic indicators and charts that show correlation but not causation.

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Note: The comments over there are worth a read as well.

A sankey diagram illustrating where one particular Shanghai office worker spends his money.

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There are a number of interesting and well designed charts in the 2011 Global Wealth Report from Credit Suisse. The private sector actually does a lot of good analysis and visualization work that just doesn’t get publicized much.

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This one took me a minute to figure out – it’s showing distribution of wealth by decile:

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There are a series of charts on wealth and age:

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Thanks to Sean R for sending in the link!

The World Economic Forum always has some interesting visualizations and info-videos.

Global Risk Map:

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Interactive Risk Explorer (be sure to play with the menu tabs on the right):

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Updated for January: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, what the typical ranges are, and lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care. In other words, it’s a very sleek example of how to graph snapshot data while still providing valuable context.

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The Fortune Magazine website for this study has lots of related articles and indicators. My favorite it the interactive “Perkfinder” – you select the benefits most important to you, and it tells you which of the top 100 companies provide them:

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