Bailout Archive:

The FT has an audio annotated slideshow explaining the proposal.
(note, to get around FT’s registration try this link)

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Toles

In: Bailout Humor Politics

3 Feb 2010

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A little silly, but the size of the CEOs head shows his pay vs the average worker 1970-2005.

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Powerful summary from the Harvard Business Review (hardcopy apparently) via The Big Picture.

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A very nice treemap presentation — you can drill down by year and company level. Clicking on a company box will bring up their own comments on compensation policies. Well done WSJ!

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Recovery.org has an interactive map that lets you track where the spending is going (down to the street level).

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How the composition of the Fed’s balance sheet has changed over time. I would like to have seen the past two years blown up in detail. (via Ritzholtz).

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Interactive table. Select an industry, sort by any column.

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A bit dated as these were prepared in the lead up to the Pittsburgh summit a few weeks ago. Worth passing on nonetheless.

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A checklist of the G20’s April London Summit pledges and whether they’ve been fulfilled. Included some nice graphics on IMF and tax reforms.

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G20 Stimulus and Fiscal Deficit map. Use the slider to look at the changes 2007-2010. Mouse over a country to view popup data details.

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A WSJ op-ed that presents a convincing argument that we can’t blame stupid people for the financial crisis (though they certainly helped).

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A funky little interactive map from USA Today.  Click on a state on the map and the appropriate little dot on the sorted chart on the right will highlight to show you it’s ranking. When you change the indicator using the drop down box at the top (jobs created/total funds awarded/total funds received/unemployment rate) the dots in the chart all bounce around and resort themselves.

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The BBC has a slideshow of some “perspective” statistics on the global bailout.

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It’s unclear what the vintage of the data is, but the below map shows G20 crisis spending. Thanks to Silona for the heads up.

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