See where denial of service attacks are occurring based on hourly data. Shows flows as well as relevant news stories. You can scroll along the timeline to view different dates.

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Popularity of genres today, based on how many Google Play Music users have those artists or albums in their libraries. It takes a second to wrap your head around the temporal aspects of it – it’s basically looking at music that is in most people’s playlists now and telling you when it was made. It’s hard to tell if this is thus revealed preference of how good each genre was at each time, how popular, how enduring, or how old people are (whose music collections go back further?). Ok, I’m not sure exactly what this means. Haha!

Each stripe on the graph represents a genre; the thickness of the stripe tells you roughly the popularity of music released in a given year in that genre. (For example, the "jazz" stripe is thick in the 1950s since many users’ libraries contain jazz albums released in the ’50s.) Click on the stripes to zoom into more specialized genres.

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Some entertaining, creative, and borderline obsessive work over at FlowingData creating charts illustrating the top 100 memorable movie quotes (as identified by the AFI).

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24 hours of global airplane traffic.

Muzak used to try to systematically lift your mood to encourage shopping – basically they were shopping DJs. I have several of the old albums – pretty funny stuff. Here’s a great article about the history of Muzak.

What the USA would have looked like if every succession and state partition movement had succeeded.

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It’s important to know the difference between correlation and causation when using charts. Duh. Below is a good example of why.

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Interesting analysis of the composition of Reddit content. Randy Olson has a great blog post about how the chart was created.

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Ok, I lied. It’s really only updated every three hours – but it’s still pretty awesome. You can zoom in and rotate the globe to see whichever hemisphere you’re interested in.

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You can even change the map projection used:

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The creator asked 30 people to draw a map of the world and then combined the results. Pretty sad. (the bottom image – it’s a mockup, not an exact replica of the real result)

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The original drawings are even more pathetic, for the most part:

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This one is pretty impressive:

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Interesting breakdown of the costs of military and national guard personnel, and how they’ve been used this century. (related article)

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Home equity vs mortgage debt is about to flip back to the good side.

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Of course, this is on a net basis, so a lot of people are still underwater – 6.3 million according to one estimate (13% of mortgages).

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This map is missing a proper label for the legend (sigh) but it is apparently “concentration of underwater mortgages”.

Zillow has a similar interactive analysis that let’s you zoom in, if you want to see how your region is doing:

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • Jeremy: The screen usually gets larger for every phone, even though the size of the device itself follows th [...]
  • Stacy: Needing a color scheme [...]
  • Greg Armstrong: This is riveting data visualization. [...]
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