Updated regularly Archive:

From the Economist:

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Which is just a recycled version of Moody’s regularly updated map (that includes pop-up drill downs):

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Interactive results of a survey of 54 economists, on a number of indicators and issues. Updated Monthly. Related article.

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Quite similar to the AP map I mentioned last month, the NYT has created a map of national unemployment (with data through May09). Some of the filters are interesting in this version:

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Always depressing, this version of the debt clock includes running values of many different kinds of debt, GDP, trade deficits, unfunded liabilities, and other ways we are shooting ourselves in the foot every day. The “about” section is pretty bleak on source details (to put it mildly). Thanks to my friend Jenny Butler for the link.

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Interactive map showing the results of recent oil and gas partnerships/negotiations/auctions. I found the map of the different oil fields interesting – considering how many maps of Iraq we’ve seen in the past 5 years, this is the first time I’ve seen this info. Will be updated over time.

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Interactive display of central bank interest rates. It would be useful if you could scroll in and enlarge the last couple years, obviously. It looks like they might update this regularly.

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Moody’s US job forecast by region, sector, etc.

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Updated June 24th. The best part is the lower chart showing the latest data for each of the 11 “leading indicators”.

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Ok, obviously it’s NY Fed day at ChartPorn. Interactive PDF files (click on events to jump to more details) provide a detailed list of policy actions and events. It is supposedly updated the 1st of every month.

There is both a domestic version, organized by Fed Policy Actions/Market Events/Other Policy Actions:

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And an international (G7) version, organized by Bank Liability Guarantees/Liquidity and Rescue Interventions/Other Market Interventions:

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This one from Kiplinger. Pretty standard stuff – a color-coded summary and charts for each of six components. Uses a pretty weak (but easy to understand) recovery threshold: “When at least three of the six indicators go fully positive — with a check mark from us — it’s more than likely that the recession has ended.” The "watch for" section of each indicator are interesting.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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  • Drumwaster: Good thing we have these snapshots, otherwise I'd have to rely on NASA for such data, and what do th [...]
  • Sean Collins: I'm no economist but how does raising the minimum wage help the unemployed? They have no wages to ra [...]