Source: Washington Post Archive:

To understand this chart you have to be quite the congressional procedure wonk. I think they should at least have to go back to having to talk the whole time. While standing on one foot. In uncomfortable shoes. With their mom watching.

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A number of news agencies took a crack at visualizing Obama’s 2013 budget proposal. (If you want to try it yourself, a shocking amount of detailed data is available in spreadsheet form at the OMB website).

Below is the Washington Post’s version. You can click on any box to see a column chart of historical values. It would have been nice to be able to drill down further, but this is a good start:

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The NYT created a beautiful animated – ummm – I’m not sure what this is. A dorling diagram? Well, it looks pretty, and it’s slightly more detailed than the WashPost version, but I think the brain processes square area better than circles.

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The WSJ posted five charts, but they’re nothing special:

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Wow. I didn’t realize China’s investment in the USA was so small.

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Ezra Klein takes a crack at comparing the cost of major policy decisions:

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The Post is doing a great job visualizing the election so far, with a number of clear tools that they are keeping very up to date.

First up: Maps and interactive filtering of spending on ads, including videos of the ads themselves:

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A Primary Tracker: mapping out candidate visits, “pre-game analysis”, results by county, and “post-game analysis” – for EACH state!

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And a campaign finance explorer:

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They also have something called the @MentionMachine that supposedly tracks candidates by twitter mentions and other media references that you can drill down through. Unfortunately, it isn’t working for me on either Firefox or IE.

There are a lot of these graphs out there. What I like about this presentation from the WSJ is that each dot in each bar can be clicked on for a short biography of the person who died – a nice combination of information and gravitas.

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CNN’s tool maps out where they came from and where they died, and provides an area for others to leave memories for each fallen. While information rich, this one felt very sterile to me, and I couldn’t find anyone that had the “memories” section filled in.

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The NYT’s went strangely artsy, with a digitized mosaic menu of the fallen’s faces:

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The Washington Post’s Faces of the Fallen feature does a good job of presenting summary information, as well as photos of each soldier:

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And the Huffington post comes up with the least interactive, self-identified as interactive (ALL CAPS IN THE TITLE!!!), series of charts I’ve even seen. Pretty sad.

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The Washington Post added family type to it’s interactive map of census data (the map also allows you to filter over time, race, density, etc). You can zoom in and see how your county compares to the rest of the country. Interesting observations: Married people with children only make up 7% of Washington DC?!? Utah is one of the few remaining regions with high “married w/children” percentages, compared to previous years when it was more common across the country.

Just 51 percent of all adults who are 18 and older are married, placing them on the brink of becoming a minority, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census statistics to be released Wednesday. That represents a steep drop from 57 percent who were married in 2000… In 1960, for example, when most baby boomers were children, 72 percent of all adults were married. The median age for brides was barely 20, and the grooms were just a couple of years older. (related article)

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A nicely annotated analysis of changing house prices in the DC region. The main graphic shows how much you would need to earn to buy a “typical single family home”. There is also an interactive version which lets you compare information for different time periods and look at condo vs house sales. (related article)

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Cornell researchers analyzed mood content in 2.4million tweets (based on word choice) and found that Saturdays and Sunday garnered the most positive expressions and Mondays the most negative – well, during the day anyway. Interestingly, Saturday and Sunday nights were way up (down) there too. On a design note, perhaps the lower graph should have inverted the scale?  (related article)

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To be cliché: the truth may surprise you. This is a great look at the “loopholes” in our tax system, point by point. You can filter by kind of break, compare individual vs corporate, find out when they were first implemented, and see how they all add up. However, I really wish the lines in the main bar graph had matched width with the amount of the break (with the y-axis being billions of $) – at first glance that’s what I thought was going on. I’m also not sure how I feel about things like “employer contributions to health care” being considered a break. (related article)

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This interactive tool from the Washington post lets you see how much your credit score affects the interest you will pay on mortgage and auto loans.

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Some interesting charts on income distribution, from the Washington Post. (related article)

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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