Source: Economist Archive:

Home equity vs mortgage debt is about to flip back to the good side. 

image

Of course, this is on a net basis, so a lot of people are still underwater – 6.3 million according to one estimate (13% of mortgages).

image

This map is missing a proper label for the legend (sigh) but it is apparently “concentration of underwater mortgages”.

Zillow has a similar interactive analysis that let’s you zoom in, if you want to see how your region is doing:

image

Which of these do you worry about?

How effective was all the new campaign spending? I’m sure the analysis will be debated until the next election.

image

Preliminary estimates of total:

image

Also, if you’re all worked up about the election (as I was yesterday), it calmed my nerves and restored my faith in democracy a bit to read this article from Cracked (which is having oddly insightful articles lately)

I’m a little surprised by the increase in non-payers over the years.

image

Non payers by state. I’m not sure I agree with using ordinal coloring – especially when so many states fall into the 30-40% range.

image

“Eastern Europe” doesn’t really exist anymore. In fact, it never really did in the first place, according to this videographic.

image

From The Economist:

OUTSIDE China, people tend to assume that the country’s impressive economic growth is due to exports. As the chart below, drawn from our special report on China’s economy, shows, this notion has always been exaggerated and is now plain false. China grows thanks to high levels of investment—far higher than those seen in previous Asian miracles such as South Korea and Japan. The corollary of this is low levels of private consumption. Some argue that this must lead to imbalances that one day will send China’s economy off a cliff. We disagree.

image

Graphing the Corruption Perceptions Index vs the Human Development Index shows a pretty clear correlation. Of course, “perception” indices are always of dubious value.image

This is a strange little tool: an interactive index to middle east unrest.

Move the sliders to ascribe different weightings to the various indicators that may influence instability (since the values shown are rounded, they may not always add up to exactly 100). Lock individual sliders by clicking the checkboxes. Roll over the chart to see indicators for each country.

image

Even though the “content limit” is only 140 characters, each tweet actually contains a crazy amount of meta-data. (related Economist article; via The Big Picture)

image

America’s military spending is larger than the next 17 countries combined.

image

In some parts of the world, marrying young is commonplace. I couldn’t find the exact comparison for the United States, but the median age when married is 26 (2009). Wikipedia lists data for additional countries, if you’re interested.

image

Interactive tree map of the top 20 charts viewed on the Economist’s website.

Interactive menu of Economist magazine top charts of year 2010


What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • Coffey: Not to mean but the theory that Christianity is the one and only true religion is questionable. I s [...]
  • Drumwaster: Good thing we have these snapshots, otherwise I'd have to rely on NASA for such data, and what do th [...]
  • Sean Collins: I'm no economist but how does raising the minimum wage help the unemployed? They have no wages to ra [...]
  • Benjamin: There is actually a difference between items showing up in your timeline (when you like a page and F [...]
  • Westrim: I am a Californian and I approve of this message. [...]