Science Archive:

Helical Orbits

In: Maps Science Video

26 Dec 2012

We’ve seen some takes on this before (here, here, and here), but this one seems the most accurate. Man, we’re small.

Bird Family Tree

In: Science

20 Dec 2012

A Yale-led scientific team has produced the most comprehensive family tree for birds to date, connecting all living bird species — nearly 10,000 in total — and revealing surprising new details about their evolutionary history and its geographic context. (summary article; another)

It looks like someone did an amazing amount of research into bird diversification. But I can’t really understand all of what this visualization is telling me because the original article is hidden behind a paywall at Nature.

http://sheffield.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.221004!/file/bird-family-tree2.gif

Pythagorean Theorem

In: Science

18 Dec 2012

Sometimes the best way to explain something is to demonstrate it.

W8VJp

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation collects detailed information on global health issues, and produces a number of interesting visualizations.

How people died in 2010 – by cause, age, and filterable by sex and region:

image

Life expectancy in the US (1989-2009). Who knew it varied so much?

image

Drill-downable US Causes of Death (1970-2006)

image

and many many more.

A practical combination of diagram and example. Simple is usually best.

image

At first I didn’t like it – too busy and radial diagrams are always annoying. Then I looked at the information and realized there was quite a lot there. Then I started looking at the legend and realized the information isn’t really clear. So now I don’t like it again.

image

Very nice heat chart. I wonder what would happen if you filtered by geography? An awful lot of people I knew in northern NY were born 9 months after the cold dark winter.

More colorful Tableau version:

image

Brain Size and Diet

In: Science

8 Nov 2012

I love these evolutionary causation theories.

A study published yesterday in the journal PNAS puts weight behind the hypothesis that–more than any social or environmental factor–humans own their giant cognitive leap to the ancestral chefs and proto grill masters who invented cooked food.

Why? According to the researchers, a diet of raw foods can’t support an endless growth of both brawn and brains. Larger body sizes and bigger brains both meant more energy use, which meant more time spent eating each day.

And, since no primate can sustain a daily foraging requirement of much more than eight hours (gorillas average close to eight, but sometimes spend closer to nine), our ancestors must have found some way to get more energy in less time.

I don’t know that I buy the summary argument, but viewing “time spent getting calories” as a driver of intelligence and socialization selection is intriguing.

Thanks to Will T. for sending in the link!

A great diagram about different options and their efficacy. The related article goes into more detail on each remedy.

image

Beautiful gif illustrating simultaneous orbits.

nvdaH

There’s also an interactive version which allows you to do cool things like pick the year, and view Tychonian (earth-centric) orbits or zodiac houses.

p.s: sorry for not posting in a while – I was in Asia for several weeks, and while they do have internet there, I was busy exploring instead of digging up infographics:

image

To be honest, I get submitted so many crap info-posters, I almost didn’t catch this one. Lots of interesting content, and the animation is a nice aesthetic innovation (though probably not really necessary, of course).

Cheetah: Nature's Speed Machine, by Jacob O'Neal

In related news, the Washington DC Zoo has had a steady crop of adorable cheetah cubs the past few years. Click the link for some awww-some pictures.

image

Based on a Popular Mechanics review of every commercial jet crash in the United States since 1971, that had both fatalities and survivors.

In 11 of the 20 crashes, rear passengers clearly fared better. Only five accidents favored those sitting forward. Three were tossups, with no particular pattern of survival. In one case, seat positions could not be determined.

 

image


What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • mema: It is a powerful symbol they've got there... stone is always a solid addition to any facade...and fo [...]
  • qka: The red arc in the Citi logo comes from Travelers Insurance, which was absorbed by Citi. Travelers f [...]
  • Steanne: nationwide insurance just returned to their eagle logo, restyled, after they found it still had bett [...]
  • Max O: Yeah I love it too. And the Nazi's had some excellent branding, type-faces, and logos too...I hope w [...]
  • Brian: Love the font! [...]