Science Archive:

DC Gunfire

In: Maps Science

4 Nov 2013

A map of gunshots detected in Washington DC since 2009 using triangulated sonic sensors. The system allows police to be quickly dispatched to within yards of where the guns were fired (though the related article doesn’t go into much detail about whether that leads to catching the shooters).

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Beautiful annotated animation of how gas engines work. Check out the full size version by Jacob O’Neal.

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A beautiful classic from 1944:

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Nice work by Bill Rankin over at Radial Cartography. He tries to map out lands that were really uninhabited prior to discovery. You’ll notice they were mostly small islands.

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If you like maps and haven’t browsed that site before, you should. Lots of cool projects:

A table of projections:

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Comparison of subways in the USA:

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Make a personalized celestial calendar:

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Below is a map of the orbits of 1400+ asteroids as collected by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab. Thankfully, none of these potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) are expected to intersect the Earth’s orbit in the next 100 years, since they are all at least 460 feet in size and would hurt.

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What’s Hurting Us

In: Science

5 Aug 2013

From the New England Journal of Medicine comes this chart of world injuries. The differences between regions are interesting, but beg explanation. Also, the article fails to give a good definition of the indicators (Years of Life Lost, Years Lived with Disability?), and you have to wonder how accurate the data is for many regions.

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Meteorite fireballs witnessed from 1913. I’m not sure what is gained by putting this on a map. Also, since this is just eyewitness accounts, it suffers from population density bias.

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A very cool real time animated map of wind.

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Also some historical snapshots, like Hurricane Sandy:

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We’ve seen similar maps before, but it’s nice to have them all together from one reliable source.

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A lot of these are misleading – but hey, so are most charts. For more entertaining interpretations of the same figures, check out The Washington Post’s “31 Charts to Destroy Your Faith in Humanity.”

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It’s interesting how popular animated gifs have become again. I guess that even with high speed internet people are a little fed up with player load times and lags. Here GIFs are used to show time lapse satellite images of mankind’s impact on the earth. (google earth link)

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The R is my friend blog used some nifty coding to analyze 2,500+ dissertations (though only those since 2007). (via)

Most were between 100 and 200 pages.

The below boxplot shows the length by topic. It could have used a legend to verify, but traditionally, the vertical line is the median, the colored areas are the 1st and third quartiles, the horizontal line is the range of extreme values (1.5x the inter quartile from the upper and lower quartile, and the dots are outliers (greater than 1.5 the inter-quartile range). Make sense? Of course, page length doesn’t actually indicate much of anything… so this whole exercise is pointless – just like most PhDs. :)

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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