Reference Archive:

This is a bit old (the data ends in July ’08), but I like this animated approach to displaying high frequency data over time. Something like this might be interesting to do for cross-country financial data-series.

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Impressively, Jon Peltier came up with a way to do this in excel (and check out his blog for other really cool excel chart tricks and solutions)

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Available as a print or free PDF file, from Financial Graph and Art. (via Ritholtz)

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Simple instructions on how to break into a Master combo lock in less than 100 attempts (instead of trying all 64,000 possible combinations). (via)

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A wonderful interactive chart showing the frequency range of various musical instruments and how they correspond to human hearing.

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The NYT has a nice tiny tool that provides the most recent data for 25 economic indicators (housing, employment, production, confidence, etc). It appears at the top of their “Economy” page, and an ugly version of the flash tool can be viewed directly here.

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The St. Louis Federal Reserve has an excellent graphing tool called Fred Graph. You can view a variety of economic (not just banking) data over any time period, add/delete series at will, and download the raw data. Below is an example of commercial, consumer, and real estate loans (1940-today); and the same data zoomed in on 2007-today (note the total absence of increased lending). To start, pick a data series from the Fred Page  then click on the graph itself to bring up more design options.

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Call up monthly slivers of data and related news for 6 financial market indicators (dow, treasury yields, libor, commercial yields, CDS spreads, mortgage backed spreads).

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Here is this month’s update of one of my favorite presentations of economic indicators, from Russell Investments. Includes trending, useful popups, drill down links to historical data, and good descriptions of each indicator. It’s really everything an economic dashboard should look like. (ok, maybe they could animate it over time.)

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From Ritholtz. more of a timeline quiz than a chart.

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1. Tulip Mania
2. South Sea /Mississippi Company Bubbles
3. Railway Mania
4. Florida Speculative Building Mania
5. Roaring 1920s/1929
6. Poseidon Bubble
7. Gold
8. Japanese Asset Bubble
9. Dot Com/Tech/Telecoms
10. Global Real Estate/Credit Bubble
11. China/Shanghai Index Stock Bubble
12. Commodity Bubble
13. Oil Bubble
14. Leverage/Derivative/Financial Bubble

Airline Fees

In: Culture Reference

8 Jul 2009

As you plan your summer vacations, a useful table. Spotted by Dataviz. (note the flight change and baggage fees – why does anyone fly those airlines anymore?)

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Always depressing, this version of the debt clock includes running values of many different kinds of debt, GDP, trade deficits, unfunded liabilities, and other ways we are shooting ourselves in the foot every day. The “about” section is pretty bleak on source details (to put it mildly). Thanks to my friend Jenny Butler for the link.

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One more July 4th themed infographic to end the weekend. Spotted by CoolInfographics.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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