Maps Archive:

Immigration has always been a tough issue to deal with.


The chart reminds me of this John Stewart bit on immigration and “Traditional America”:

This has been making the rounds. Based on 150,000 geocoded tweets from June 2012 to April 2013, filtered 1st by use of word, and then manually whether it was used in a negative or derogatory fashion.

Obviously this suffers from selection bias as it only includes people who bother to tweet, and those who aren’t ashamed to do it publicly. There’s also the usual population density distortion (last map below), which would be compounded by cell phone coverage out west. So, basically, this is another pretty visualization of social media meta data that doesn’t really mean much of anything. To be honest I’m surprised they only found 150,000 hateful tweets in 11 months. (The author’s FAQ is an interest read)





It’s interesting how popular animated gifs have become again. I guess that even with high speed internet people are a little fed up with player load times and lags. Here GIFs are used to show time lapse satellite images of mankind’s impact on the earth. (google earth link)


Using location data from over 1 million photos taken by astronauts on the International Space Station provides us with another “revealed” map of the world. These big data meta analysis generally annoy me, but for some reason when they are done on a map I find them downright artistic.


The author, Nathan Bergey, has additional breakdown maps by mission, etc on his website if you’re interested.

Heat maps of apartment rental prices in DC:


and Boston:


and many many other cities using a tool created by Jeff Kaufman.

(via welovedc)

This year, in interactive format, allowing you to select a base currency and see the changes over time.


Amusing and accurate. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the original source to link back to.

update: created by Julian Lozos. Nice work!


Sure, the internet and the information revolution has been fun. But before that there was the communication revolution. And before that, it was transportation:

rates of travel in 1800srates of travel 1830

rates of travel 1857

rates of travel 1930s

(original source: 1932 Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which has a number of other cool historical maps)

Apparently the forecasts for the current heat-wave in Australia are so hot that the Bureau of Meteorology had to add two new colors to it’s forecasting map:


And here is the NYT version of of the 2012 temperature map. I like the city histograms at the bottom.


An amusing map from 1927, showing which areas of California could be used to film movies that you wanted to look like other parts of the world.

filming locations

Helical Orbits

In: Maps Science Video

26 Dec 2012

We’ve seen some takes on this before (here, here, and here), but this one seems the most accurate. Man, we’re small.

DC Metro Station Traffic

In: Maps

21 Dec 2012

Interesting analysis of metro traffic. But I am always left wanting by ordinal rankings. Perhaps coloring the stations themselves in a heatmap manner while desaturating the line colors would have been more useful.

On the same site is the awesome “Evolution of Metrorail” utility that let’s you cycle through the opening of new stations since 1976:


What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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  • An Opinion: When you're disparaging the communications techniques of someone whose message is nearly universally [...]
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  • Someone: Where are the dead killed by Terrorists? [...]
  • Raphael: Also, it looks a lot like the Treasure Island casino logo, after their recent rebranding as "ti" [...]