Interactive Archive:

Beautiful gif illustrating simultaneous orbits.

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There’s also an interactive version which allows you to do cool things like pick the year, and view Tychonian (earth-centric) orbits or zodiac houses.

p.s: sorry for not posting in a while – I was in Asia for several weeks, and while they do have internet there, I was busy exploring instead of digging up infographics:

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Some fantastically clear interactive maps from the Washington Post, identifying tossups in each race (Presidential, Senate, House, Governor).

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Dynamic bubble chart showing compensation ranges for startups across different job types. I’m kinda afraid to ask what a “Sales Engineer” is.

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Ok, maybe I’m just in a bad mood because I’m back at work after a nice long vacation – but I think this visualization sucks. All it does is ordinally identify the top five linked countries for each country. There is no scale. What does the bubble size indicate? No matter what country you click on, the top five all grow to about the same size. Is the 4th relationship really almost as strong as the 2nd? Who knows? The methodology states “Rankings between countries are based on the number of Facebook friendships between countries and the total number of Facebook friendships within each country.” Ummm… how, exactly? Is it a ratio? Is the total number used as a weight?  Thankfully they color coded it based on the continents – because everyone has trouble identifying those, right? Oh, and Seychelles will be happy to know it’s now in Asia. Totally useless.

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I guess today is the day of map posts! Here is one from the Economist that shows which countries participated in each summer Olympics since 1896. You can see the stupid 1980/84 boycotts by east and west, for example.

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Four maps (one of them with interactive annotations), a bar chart, and a related article – and none of them explain how “drought” is defined. What is the difference between severe, extreme, and exceptional drought? They all sound terrible.

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In search of context, I went to the Drought Monitor site, where I found more cool looking maps and animated gifs…

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… and finally a “what is drought” section, and a link to a comparison of major drought indices and indicators (none of which explained how the categories used by the drought monitor are defined), and a link back to monitor site. At which point I gave up.

A beautifully executed timeline of the history of the web. But really, why does anyone care when different kinds of html were included in each browser? Does anyone actually find this kind of internet navel gazing to be interesting?

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Olympic Games

In: Interactive Sports

20 Jul 2012

The Guardian has created explanatory infographics for just about every game. Some are better than others. They also have interactive guides to many of the sports. I imagine we’ll see lots of these in the coming weeks.

For example, for beach volleyball. They should have explained the scorekeeping like they did for normal volleyball.

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Interactive guides:

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Trulia now maps commute times in cities around the country.

One of the reasons I love DC: You can get just about anywhere in less than 30 minutes

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Click on each state in the map with your predictions, and the running total at the bottom will tell you who wins! You can also cycle through the results of elections 1789-2008, which is entertaining if you read the little election facts at the bottom of each map.

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Personally, it kind of reminded me of playing Risk on the computer back in college.

An interactive online Hue test. It’s a little tedious to sort all the squares – but kind of challenging too. I got a 20, which apparently puts me in the top 25% or so.

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Not sure what kind of chart best suits your data? Use the tabs at the top to indicate what kind of comparison you want to make.

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Not much different than the original version, really.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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