Interactive Archive:

So, how does America’s middle class compare to those around the world? Not as good as it used to.

It takes a second to absorb these charts, but they show how other countries’ middle class incomes have closed the gap on the USA from 1980 to 2010. Except for our top income brackets – they are still the richest of all.

The original article tries to explain parts of this trend.

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And annotated interactive narrative of about 20 charts on trends in death. This was done by Bloomberg, which has a number of these well done data mining narratives.

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Somewhat obvious, but fun to look at the details. The original NYT article points out some of the more contentious borders.

 

Josh Worth created a horizontal map of the solar system using a scale of 1 pixel = diameter of moon.  There’s a lot of nothing out there (but Josh does add some amusing commentary to help pass the time scrolling between planets).

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Map of all kinds of energy related things: coal fields, mines, oil/gas pipelines/storage, electrical transmission lines, wind turbine potential, offshore windspeeds, solar potential, etc. You get the idea.

It’s not the smoothest operating interactive map I’ve ever seen (lots of delays in loading, etc) – but it works if you’re patient.

Thanks to Mr. Brown for sending me the link.

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Plots outbreaks of measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, rubella, and other diseases that are easily preventable by cheap and effective vaccines. (via)

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The Economist has updated their annual Big Mac Index.

…based on the theory of purchasing-power parity (PPP), the notion that in the long run exchange rates should move towards the rate that would equalise the prices of an identical basket of goods and services (in this case, a burger) in any two countries. For example, the average price of a Big Mac in America in January 2014 was $4.62; in China it was only $2.74 at market exchange rates. So the “raw” Big Mac index says that the yuan was undervalued by 41% at that time. Burgernomics was never intended as a precise gauge of currency misalignment, merely a tool to make exchange-rate theory more digestible.

Interesting footnotes: India’s Maharaja Mac is made out of chicken.

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According to this Harvard study, on average people today are just as likely to be better off than our parents than the generation 50 years ago was. I wonder if they adjusted incomes for debt? (I’m too lazy to check).

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I’m not sure why it took the Washington Post six months longer than the NYT to do an article and map about this. NYT’s interactive map/chart combo helps grasp what they’re measuring:

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Ok, I lied. It’s really only updated every three hours – but it’s still pretty awesome. You can zoom in and rotate the globe to see whichever hemisphere you’re interested in.

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You can even change the map projection used:

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Ok, I doubt many people really give a shit about the scenic breakdown of the six Rocky movies, but the implementation of this interactive graphic is pretty impressive. The real time scanning of the entire movies is very cool, and the whole think is snappy and responsive. Well done.

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An interactive map showing the range of radio stations in the United States.

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I tried to find a version of this including commercial stations, but the best was maps of coverage areas for single stations from radio-locator.com.

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Nicely done. I suspect some people might think that London is given credit for more than it deserves.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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