Finance Archive:

A series of 30+ charts on unemployment, wages, corporate profits, income inequality, debt, taxes, and bailouts from the Business Insider. It’s actually quite an accurate compendium, and the narrative annotation spices up what are otherwise pretty dry charts from the St. Louis Fed (note: if you’ve never used the FRED data/graphing system, you should really go play with it – they even have an APP now). I particularly like the sequence where they illustrate that banks are borrowing money from the FED at basically zero interest rates, and using it to buy treasuries. Hilarious.

 image

What is shocking to me is that there are 12 states with no shortfall.

image

Note: Some Financial Times features require a subscription.

Cheap money and slow growth in the advanced countries has led to large capital flows to emerging market countries, as this interactive tool from the WSJ shows. If you mouse over each country you can view countries’ policy responses. I really like these map/graph combo designs – the two go very well together.

image

From MSNBC and the American University: Identify your bank (or credit union) by name or location, then see how many non-performing loans and other troubled assets it has:

 image image

of related interest is this 2010 chart that Barry Ritholtz recently noted:

image

Interactive comparison of bank market capitalization, income, and employees. The data are interesting, but the color selection could use more contrast, and the representation of negative values for net income is just bizarre.

image

Note: some FT features require a subscription.

Bloomberg compiled some stunning new data on Fed loans to Wall Street banks during the crisis based across multiple programs (Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility, Commercial Paper Funding Facility, discount window, PDCF, TAF, Term Securities Lending Facility and single-tranche open market operations). (related article; via The Big Picture)

I wish I could borrow from the Fed at <2% using junk bonds as collateral. 

image

You get the below charts by selecting multiple banks to compare them:

image

Catherine Mulbrandon visualizes how long it takes to pay off a new computer making the minimum payment versus $100/month.

image

I’m posting this more because it’s an example of a well designed cartogram map, more than because of the content. (via)

image

Ok, I’m pretty bored with the debt graphics, but Barry Ritholtz today had a few that illustrate the problem quite well.

This one makes clear our deficit is as much a result of falling revenue as it is of rising spending:

image

The same numbers in percent of GDP make sense when you take the recession shading into account:

image

I highly recommend you read the article and discussion over there.

Four perfect graphs from the NYT (as usual) putting the debt crisis into perspective.

image image

image image

Thanks to Kanal Eliezer for sending in the link!

WTFnoway.com presents literal visualizations of how many Benjamins the US debt really amounts to.

image image

image

image

An interesting chart on different benchmarks that are required by the Bill. At closer inspection though, you realize all it does is describe the sections and count the requirements. It would have been nice if you could drill down and see the details of each of the colored lines, for example. The main impression remains, however: the Bill’s implementation is very complicated – which I suppose is in contrast to the wide agreement that it doesn’t actually solve any of our financial systems’ problems.

image


What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • Coffey: Not to mean but the theory that Christianity is the one and only true religion is questionable. I s [...]
  • Drumwaster: Good thing we have these snapshots, otherwise I'd have to rely on NASA for such data, and what do th [...]
  • Sean Collins: I'm no economist but how does raising the minimum wage help the unemployed? They have no wages to ra [...]
  • Benjamin: There is actually a difference between items showing up in your timeline (when you like a page and F [...]
  • Westrim: I am a Californian and I approve of this message. [...]