Environment/weather Archive:

It’s interesting how popular animated gifs have become again. I guess that even with high speed internet people are a little fed up with player load times and lags. Here GIFs are used to show time lapse satellite images of mankind’s impact on the earth. (google earth link)

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Recent studies add to the evidence that we are changing the world:

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If you want to see what “climate change” really means, as in what will be changing where, check out the 2013 National Climate Assessment report. It’s fantastic, and chuck full of visualizations:

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One side effect: More shipping in the Arctic:

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Apparently the forecasts for the current heat-wave in Australia are so hot that the Bureau of Meteorology had to add two new colors to it’s forecasting map:

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And here is the NYT version of of the 2012 temperature map. I like the city histograms at the bottom.

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It didn’t just FEEL hot. It WAS hot.

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Cool graphic from National Geographic:

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Hurricanes since 1851:

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Earthquakes since 1898:

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Fires 2001-2012:

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Four maps (one of them with interactive annotations), a bar chart, and a related article – and none of them explain how “drought” is defined. What is the difference between severe, extreme, and exceptional drought? They all sound terrible.

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In search of context, I went to the Drought Monitor site, where I found more cool looking maps and animated gifs…

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… and finally a “what is drought” section, and a link to a comparison of major drought indices and indicators (none of which explained how the categories used by the drought monitor are defined), and a link back to monitor site. At which point I gave up.

It’s nice to see a sankey diagram be used for something besides energy. As some have noted, however, this should have been complemented with population adjusted stats.

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http://flowingdata.com/2012/06/06/overfishing-visually-explained/A well narrated video-graphic. (via FlowingData)

This visualization shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of the Earth’s water compared to the size of the Earth. Yikes! That’s a lot of dirt and rock!

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Thanks to D. Cramer for emailing me the link!

Explore tornados by location, size, cost and other factors.

Tableau version:
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Tornado History Project’s version:image

and NOAA has a number of beautiful tornado and storm visualizations on it’s site (from which the other two get their data):
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Glub

In: Environment/weather

29 Mar 2012

Climate Central lets you zoom in on a map and visualize how much of our coast will be underwater if sea levels rise. You can adjust how much increase there is using the slider. Some experts say we should expect 2-7 feet higher by end of century. (via)

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An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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