Employment Archive:

A fantastic annotated heatmap from the Washington Post breaking down job creation/loss by sector. On the right is an interactive, slightly more annotated, line chart version of the same data. I prefer the heatmap. (related article)

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Based on these indicators, things are returning to normal.

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I’m sure the devil is in the details, as usual, but aggregate statistics like this are always good background to any debate. Thanks to KD Kelly for the link!

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Patchwork Nation tracks a number of traditional economic and social indicators over time – but they also include some interesting alternative ones:

Cracker Barrel restaurants and Whole Foods Stores:
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Gun shops and Casinos:
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Bankruptcies 2007 vs 2010:
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Change in family income 1980-2010:
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One of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, and what the typical ranges are. It also lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care, and historical values.

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Karl Hartig was creating beautiful complex data visualizations back when most of us “graphics experts” were still trying to figure out how to change colors in excel.  Here is a selection of his work on population, electronics, energy, stocks, immigration, politics, and music. Soak it up!

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The NYT lays out the charts and explains why simple aggregate comparisons are not valid.

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The ebb and flow of volunteers and regions served.

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An interactive map of adults with college degrees. Filter by race or income or drill down to your county.  I’m not sure if it’s more surprising that it went from 4.6% to 27.5%, or that we’re only at 27.5% today. How long do you suppose before someone puts this next to a red/blue state map? (via Sociological Images)

1940 vs 2009:

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The Wall Street Journal has pulled together some interesting differences between the sexes concerning marital, educational, and employment trends.

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Gallup surveyed Americans on 20 different quality of life indicators (stress, depression, health problems, job satisfaction, exercise, etc), and the New York Times threw them all on a map for contemplation. Below is the composite “Well-Being index”. Thanks to Allison Stanfill for the link! (related article)

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Gallup’s website compares the indicators over time:

A similar Gallup index of “US Satisfaction”  was also recently visualized by Good:

I had a conversation last night about “knowledge” education vs “skill” education that reminded me of this xkcd chart. The skills I learned hacking computers and building art projects have contributed much more to my career success than anything I learned in graduate school.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

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