Employment Archive:

There are a number of interesting and well designed charts in the 2011 Global Wealth Report from Credit Suisse. The private sector actually does a lot of good analysis and visualization work that just doesn’t get publicized much.

image image image  image

This one took me a minute to figure out – it’s showing distribution of wealth by decile:

image

There are a series of charts on wealth and age:

image image

Thanks to Sean R for sending in the link!

The World Economic Forum always has some interesting visualizations and info-videos.

Global Risk Map:

image

Interactive Risk Explorer (be sure to play with the menu tabs on the right):

image

Updated for January: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, what the typical ranges are, and lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care. In other words, it’s a very sleek example of how to graph snapshot data while still providing valuable context.

image

image

The Fortune Magazine website for this study has lots of related articles and indicators. My favorite it the interactive “Perkfinder” – you select the benefits most important to you, and it tells you which of the top 100 companies provide them:

image

A treemap of the jobs that the 1% are doing – showing a lot of variety. I wish there was more detail about the dataset source. The related article provides some anecdotal examples.

image

Enter your household income and see where you rank in 344 areas around the country:

image

 

There’s some interesting behind the scenes information on the news paper version here:

image

(via FlowingData)

A clear message from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

image

Thanks to E. Kanal for passing it on!

Updated for November: one of my favorite economic dashboards. It highlights major macro indicators, what direction they are trending, and what the typical ranges are. It also lets you drill down to explanations of why you should care, and historical values.

image

Some very well organized statistics on the Eurozone debt crisis, aggregated from the IMF, OECD, Eurostat, and the World Bank. It includes data on EFSF commitments, debt, SGP criteria, employment, trade, pensions, and mortgages. There are multiple dashboards, each with multiple tabs – so take the time to explore a bit. I particularly like the little sparklines – which I think do a great job of quickly illustrating trends, and don’t get used often enough.

image

I haven’t posted this version in a while, but the WSJ does keep it up to date with the latest data. I think it’s a lovely use of a heatmap.

image

A series of 30+ charts on unemployment, wages, corporate profits, income inequality, debt, taxes, and bailouts from the Business Insider. It’s actually quite an accurate compendium, and the narrative annotation spices up what are otherwise pretty dry charts from the St. Louis Fed (note: if you’ve never used the FRED data/graphing system, you should really go play with it – they even have an APP now). I particularly like the sequence where they illustrate that banks are borrowing money from the FED at basically zero interest rates, and using it to buy treasuries. Hilarious.

 image

An elegant multi-indicator graphic from the NYT on income inequality and jobs. It’s disappointing that it took so long for the story of these trends to get traction in the media. (related article)

image


What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • Will Reinhardt: I had no idea that China was all in one timezone, that’s crazy to me. If you walk from China to Pa [...]
  • Coffey: Not to mean but the theory that Christianity is the one and only true religion is questionable. I s [...]
  • Drumwaster: Good thing we have these snapshots, otherwise I'd have to rely on NASA for such data, and what do th [...]
  • Sean Collins: I'm no economist but how does raising the minimum wage help the unemployed? They have no wages to ra [...]
  • Benjamin: There is actually a difference between items showing up in your timeline (when you like a page and F [...]