Culture Archive:

Loren Munk

In: Culture History

25 Feb 2014

Artist Loren Munk has created many beautiful interpretations of art history, genres, and incubators.

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My personal favorite:

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Facebook analyzed peoples online interactions zeroed around relationship status events. It turns out (not surprisingly I suppose) that relationship changes track closely with online interactions.

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and what kind of posts they are interacting with:

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Here’s what a breakup looks like:

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Amusing. Apparently Denver fans gave up watching before Seattle fans did. (Note: the image below is linked to an Imgur picture. The link to the article on PornHub is here.)

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The below is a pretty fabulous interactive chart of how porn usage is affected by global events:

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And how the 2013-14 winter’s Polar Vortex temperatures have affected Porn usage:

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The nice thing about reddit sourced graphics like this one is that they often include conversations with the author, and revisions to correct mistakes or make improvements.

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According to this Harvard study, on average people today are just as likely to be better off than our parents than the generation 50 years ago was. I wonder if they adjusted incomes for debt? (I’m too lazy to check).

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I’m not sure why it took the Washington Post six months longer than the NYT to do an article and map about this. NYT’s interactive map/chart combo helps grasp what they’re measuring:

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Popularity of genres today, based on how many Google Play Music users have those artists or albums in their libraries. It takes a second to wrap your head around the temporal aspects of it – it’s basically looking at music that is in most people’s playlists now and telling you when it was made. It’s hard to tell if this is thus revealed preference of how good each genre was at each time, how popular, how enduring, or how old people are (whose music collections go back further?). Ok, I’m not sure exactly what this means. Haha!

Each stripe on the graph represents a genre; the thickness of the stripe tells you roughly the popularity of music released in a given year in that genre. (For example, the "jazz" stripe is thick in the 1950s since many users’ libraries contain jazz albums released in the ’50s.) Click on the stripes to zoom into more specialized genres.

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Some entertaining, creative, and borderline obsessive work over at FlowingData creating charts illustrating the top 100 memorable movie quotes (as identified by the AFI).

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Muzak used to try to systematically lift your mood to encourage shopping – basically they were shopping DJs. I have several of the old albums – pretty funny stuff. Here’s a great article about the history of Muzak.

It’s important to know the difference between correlation and causation when using charts. Duh. Below is a good example of why.

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Interesting analysis of the composition of Reddit content. Randy Olson has a great blog post about how the chart was created.

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Ok, I doubt many people really give a shit about the scenic breakdown of the six Rocky movies, but the implementation of this interactive graphic is pretty impressive. The real time scanning of the entire movies is very cool, and the whole think is snappy and responsive. Well done.

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We’ve seen maps of languages around the world but it’s interesting to look a little deeper at how specific words differ across countries. Michael Kelley makes a few guesses over at Business Insider as to what explains some of the difference.

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What is Chart Porn?

An addictive collection of beautiful charts, graphs, maps, and interactive data visualization toys -- on topics from around the world.

  • twitter.com: Do you have any video of that? I'd care to find out some additional information. [...]
  • noah g: I would like to use the graph for a debate, may I have the source you used to get it because i feel [...]
  • ztech: I think people peak at different ages. its a combination of analytical thought and intutiion that a [...]
  • Lou: Some argue that Russian civilian deaths were even higher than what is depicted in this amazing video [...]
  • paul: I always thought that new york was the most expensive of all. Good infographics [...]