Bailout Archive:

Settlement and fines for mortgage abuses are starting to add up to real money. Of course, as Matt Taibbi points out, this is still just a drop in the proverbial bucket compared to the related profits and scale of activities that took place.

(disclaimer: clever post title pilfered from the Economist)

You’ll need an FT.com subscription to see it, but they have a nice presentation of where bank “spoils” (profits+staff pay) has been going to. Below are Bank of America and Citigroup.

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A billion here, a billion there – soon you’re talking about real money.

News reports often focus on debt to gdp ratios, but it’s powerful to actually show the magnitudes of each, and compare the amounts already committed to what remains to be financed, as is done here by Spiegel:

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A rawer way of looking at the debt of all of the PIIGS, in piles of euros:

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This version shows who loaned Greece the money:

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Almost makes it look like they’ve done a lot:

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A series of excellent annotated charts on the main indicators of the European crisis.

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Some very well organized statistics on the Eurozone debt crisis, aggregated from the IMF, OECD, Eurostat, and the World Bank. It includes data on EFSF commitments, debt, SGP criteria, employment, trade, pensions, and mortgages. There are multiple dashboards, each with multiple tabs – so take the time to explore a bit. I particularly like the little sparklines – which I think do a great job of quickly illustrating trends, and don’t get used often enough.

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A series of 30+ charts on unemployment, wages, corporate profits, income inequality, debt, taxes, and bailouts from the Business Insider. It’s actually quite an accurate compendium, and the narrative annotation spices up what are otherwise pretty dry charts from the St. Louis Fed (note: if you’ve never used the FRED data/graphing system, you should really go play with it – they even have an APP now). I particularly like the sequence where they illustrate that banks are borrowing money from the FED at basically zero interest rates, and using it to buy treasuries. Hilarious.

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From MSNBC and the American University: Identify your bank (or credit union) by name or location, then see how many non-performing loans and other troubled assets it has:

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of related interest is this 2010 chart that Barry Ritholtz recently noted:

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Bloomberg compiled some stunning new data on Fed loans to Wall Street banks during the crisis based across multiple programs (Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility, Commercial Paper Funding Facility, discount window, PDCF, TAF, Term Securities Lending Facility and single-tranche open market operations). (related article; via The Big Picture)

I wish I could borrow from the Fed at <2% using junk bonds as collateral. 

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You get the below charts by selecting multiple banks to compare them:

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A pretty comprehensive explanation of the financial crisis. (via The Big Picture)

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Despite media spin, the United States is a long way from getting all of the bailout money back. (via Ritholtz)

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A summary of the infamous Troubled Asset Relief Program. (via)

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